Children at Work

In accordance with provisions of Employment and labour Relations Act, 2004, a child under the age of 14 years can't be employed. A child of fourteen years of age may only be employed to do light work, which is not likely to be harmful to the child's health and development; and does not prejudice the child's attendance at school, participation in vocational orientation or training programmes approved by the competent authority or the child's capacity to benefit from the instruction received. (section 5)

The Employment and Labour Relations Act, 2004, art. 5

Read more information about Child Labour.

Equal Pay

All human beings are born equal and are equal before the law. The law also recognizes the right to work and the right to just remuneration and requires every employer to take steps for ensuring that men and women workers are paid equally for work of equal value. The Employment and Labour Relations Act, 2004 and Constitution of Tanzania, art. 12, 3, 7, 23

Forced Labour

Article 25.2 of the Constitution of Tanzania prohibits all forms of forced labour. The Employment and labour Relations Act, 2004 also prohibits all forms of forced or bonded labour. Any person who procures, demands or imposes forced labour, commits an offence (Section 6). A  person who unlawfully compels others to labour against their will commits an offence. The Child Law prohibits imposing of forced labour or bonded labour on children. A person who contravenes the provision related to forced labour from Child Law commits an offence and is, on conviction, liable to a fine of not less than two hundred thousand shillings or to imprisonment for a term of six months or to both.

Constitution of Tanzania, art. 25

Law of the Child Act 2009, Section 80

Click on Forced Labour to learn more.

Minimum Age Hazardous Work

The minimum age for hazardous work is 18 years. A person may not employ or engage a child in any kind of exploitative labour. This includes employment that is inappropriate for a person of that age; that places at risk the child's well-being, education, physical or mental health, or spiritual, moral or social development or where the child receives inadequate remuneration.

Any person who contravenes any of the provisions of related to exploitive labour commits an offence and is, on conviction, liable to a fine of not less than one hundred thousand shillings or to imprisonment for a term of three months or to both.

It is unlawful to employ or engage a child in any hazardous work. Work is considered to be hazardous when it poses a danger to the health, safety or morals of a person.

Hazardous work includes going to sea; mining and quarrying;  porterage of heavy loads; manufacturing industries where chemicals are produced or used; work in places where machines are used; and work in place such as bars, hotels and places of entertainment. Night work is also prohibited for children.

Employment and labour Relations Act, 2004, Section 5.3

Law of the Child Employment Act, 2009, Section 77-86

Non-Discrimination

In accordance with the article 13 of the Constitution, there can't be any discrimination on the basis of nationality, tribe, place of origin, political opinion, colour, religion, sex or station in life. Employment and labour Relations Act, 2004 also prohibits discrimination on the basis of color, nationality, tribe or place of origin, race, national extraction, social origin, political opinion or religion, sex, gender, pregnancy, marital  status or family responsibility, disability, HIV/aids, age or station of life. However, It is not discrimination to take affirmative action measures consistent with the promotion of equality or the elimination of discrimination in the workplace; to distinguish, exclude or prefer any person on the basis of an inherent requirement of a job; or to employ citizens in accordance with the National Employment Promotion Services Act, 1999 (section 7)

Constitution of Tanzania, art. 13 

The Employment and Labour Relations Act, 2004, art. 7

National Employment Promotion Services Act, 1999, Section 7

Right to Work

Men and women can work in the same industries without any restrictions.

Sexual Harassment

Sexual harassmenet at the workplace is considered a form of discrimination (Section 7 of the Employment and labour Relations Act, 2004) and  prohibited by law and is part of the Penal Code. The perpetrator may be imprisoned for a term not exceeding five years or to a fine not exceeding two hundred thousand shillings or to both the fine and imprisonment, and may also be ordered to pay compensation to the victim as determined by the Court. Unwelcome sexual advances by words or actions used by a person in authority, in a working place or any other place, constitutes the offence of sexual harassment. No prosecution for an offence can be instituted or continued where the complaint is made by the alleged victim at any time more than sixty days after the occurrence of the event constituting the offence. (Section 138 D of the Penal Code, 1945) 

Employment and labour Relations Act, 2004, Section 7

Penal Code, 1945, Section 138 D 

loading...
Loading...